National Aviary’s newest Penguin has a Name: Maggie

April 26, 2016 (Pittsburgh, PA) – The results are in. The National Aviary’s newest penguin, a female, is named Maggie. More than 23,000 votes were cast over 3 ½ days. And the winning name – Maggie – won by a slim margin of just 544 votes!

The voting contest was held in honor of World Penguin Day April 25 as a way to highlight this critically endangered species and the National Aviary’s programs to help save it.

National Aviary staff had selected three potential names for the penguin: Maggie, Kenzie and Madison. The name Maggie won by a slim margin, garnering just 544 more votes than Kenzie, which was the runner up. In order, the results were:

  • Maggie 10,922
  • Kenzie 10,378
  • Madison 2,045

African Penguins are a critically endangered species. As an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the National Aviary participates in an important international breeding program, called a Species Survival Plan®, aimed at keeping captive populations genetically diverse and sustainable. The National Aviary also supports and assists with programs to save wild African Penguins and is part of an AZA initiative called SAFE: Saving Animals from Extinction.

In honor of World Penguin Day the National Aviary is also seeking donations for their programs aimed at saving African Penguins from extinction. Money raised will go to support the National Aviary’s care of African Penguins. Donate below or at www.aviary.org.

Your support helps us soar!

You can help the National Aviary save this incredible species. Donate today to support the National Aviary’s African Penguin breeding program, educational and research work, and wild penguin conservation efforts.




Make a lasting impression in Penguin Point with our new Penguin Plaque program!

For a limited time only, you can make a donation to the National Aviary and receive a personalized brass plate in the Penguin Point exhibit. The Penguin Plaque program not only serves as a celebration of friends and family, but also provides building blocks for our future. Your brass plate engraving will make the National Aviary a better place for our birds, guests, and community!

Only 100 plates will be sold, so reserve your plate today!

Want to Meet a Penguin Up-Close?

The National Aviary provides a range of educational and fun opportunities to get nose-to-beak with African Penguins.

Penguin Point

The National Aviary is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and visitors can see our African Penguin colony swim, splash, and sun themselves all day. Stop by Penguin Point at 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. for the Penguin Feeding program to learn more about the colony and see them eat!

Penguin Encounters

Offered daily at 11:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., participants will get to meet a member of the National Aviary’s penguin colony up-close, learn from a keeper the penguin’s personal story, learn more about how you can help save penguins, and take lots of photos! Advance registration highly recommended. Call 412-258-9445.

Penguin Painting

Offered once a month, you can watch the National Aviary’s penguin paint with their feet and take home a unique masterpiece! Guests will have an opportunity to choose colors for their painting and watch the artist at work. The next class is May 8! Advance registration highly recommended. Call 412-258-9445.

Watch the Penguins All Day Long!

Can’t get enough of our African Penguin colony? You can watch them daily in Penguin Point through our Penguin Cam!

Get to Know the Penguin

Meet The Penguin at the National Aviary in Pittsburgh
At almost 3 years old, this new female penguin came to the National Aviary from the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. She was hatched in captivity and was raised by penguin parents.

Earlier this year she moved to Pittsburgh to help to save her species from extinction! African Penguins are a critically endangered species. The National Aviary participates in an important international breeding program, called a Species Survival Plan, aimed at keeping captive populations genetically diverse and sustainable.

The new female penguin is paired with another new arrival, a male penguin who is around her age from Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester, New York. These two new Pittsburghers have been specially selected as a valuable breeding pair because of their genetic make-up, and we are happy to report they have already started showing signs of a happy relationship.